Merci Léon

A blog dedicated to Film or;
'The Mindless Ramblings of a Film & Media Student Named Louis Cochran.'
Personal Tumblr: Leonhart

SUCKER PUNCH: My theory - Blondie’s Brother.
If in these dream/fantasy states we believe that every person in our dreams is someone we have seen before, and if we also believe that in these fantasy sequences, because all of the girls are (usually) there, that it’s a collective dream state then my theory can make sense.
In short, I believe the young boy to be Blondie’s brother who has visited her in the mental hospital with his mother recently. Because Blondie is the one who notices him and removes his helmet it’s like she recognises him but can’t place it, because in reality she’s insane, however Sweet Pea is sane, as she only followed her sister, Rocket, into the asylum to protect her, therefore it is reasonable to say that Sweet Pea has seen Blondie’s brother before and vice versa. When he looks at her in the trenches it’s almost accusatory like he knows she is faking her insanity and she looks away guiltily.
Then later, my theory explains why the same boy looks at her so suspiciously as she is about to get on the bus with him, he knows who she is and she is scared she will be found out.
—-
Anyway, that’s my theory which people could shoot to hell by informing me that the boy is played by Eli Snyder, Zack Snyder’s son, who also had small roles in 300 and Watchmen and these two scenes could’ve been just so his son got some face time in the movie in the only two scenes where a young boy could feasibly be, however, I like to believe that even if Snyder just wanted his son in the movie he wouldn’t just do it randomly and that my theory holds water.

SUCKER PUNCH: My theory - Blondie’s Brother.

If in these dream/fantasy states we believe that every person in our dreams is someone we have seen before, and if we also believe that in these fantasy sequences, because all of the girls are (usually) there, that it’s a collective dream state then my theory can make sense.

In short, I believe the young boy to be Blondie’s brother who has visited her in the mental hospital with his mother recently. Because Blondie is the one who notices him and removes his helmet it’s like she recognises him but can’t place it, because in reality she’s insane, however Sweet Pea is sane, as she only followed her sister, Rocket, into the asylum to protect her, therefore it is reasonable to say that Sweet Pea has seen Blondie’s brother before and vice versa. When he looks at her in the trenches it’s almost accusatory like he knows she is faking her insanity and she looks away guiltily.

Then later, my theory explains why the same boy looks at her so suspiciously as she is about to get on the bus with him, he knows who she is and she is scared she will be found out.

—-

Anyway, that’s my theory which people could shoot to hell by informing me that the boy is played by Eli Snyder, Zack Snyder’s son, who also had small roles in 300 and Watchmen and these two scenes could’ve been just so his son got some face time in the movie in the only two scenes where a young boy could feasibly be, however, I like to believe that even if Snyder just wanted his son in the movie he wouldn’t just do it randomly and that my theory holds water.

Watched Hanna recently and it wasn’t what I was expecting… but was even better! To be honest, I just thought it was gonna be a film where Hanna goes round on a revenge mission (which probably still would have satisfied me) but it turned into a poignant tale of self-discovery.
Saoirse Ronan was amazing (who was also in The Lovely Bones, another film I love that she was great in), and Cate Blanchett and Eric Bana gave fantastic performances too as Marissa and Erik. It was nice to see Olivia Williams too (or Adele Dewitt as she will forever be known to me as) but I didn’t like the actress chosen for Sophie. I think she was convincing as the stereotypical, teenage, English holidaymaker, but I guess I just don’t like stereotypical, teenage, English holidaymakers… and that may just be down to my lack of a holiday for ten years.
Anyway, I don’t wanna talk about the plot too much but if/when you get the chance to see this, do it.

Watched Hanna recently and it wasn’t what I was expecting… but was even better! To be honest, I just thought it was gonna be a film where Hanna goes round on a revenge mission (which probably still would have satisfied me) but it turned into a poignant tale of self-discovery.

Saoirse Ronan was amazing (who was also in The Lovely Bones, another film I love that she was great in), and Cate Blanchett and Eric Bana gave fantastic performances too as Marissa and Erik. It was nice to see Olivia Williams too (or Adele Dewitt as she will forever be known to me as) but I didn’t like the actress chosen for Sophie. I think she was convincing as the stereotypical, teenage, English holidaymaker, but I guess I just don’t like stereotypical, teenage, English holidaymakers… and that may just be down to my lack of a holiday for ten years.

Anyway, I don’t wanna talk about the plot too much but if/when you get the chance to see this, do it.

Right, although I’m still excited to see David Fincher’s remake, after actually watching the trilogy (and I will read the books one day too) this poster seems ridiculous. It goes against everything Lisbeth Salander stands for, naked and being subjected to the male gaze, while a man’s arm is around her, protecting her (or holding her back).
And I’m even more confused because I read somewhere that David Fincher had had this poster in his mind for awhile so he must have thought it’s connotations through properly and I can’t write it off as just Hollywood wanting to attract male attention. So is this the direction that Fincher wants to take the film?
Or maybe it’s a double bluff, completely turn around pre-existing ideas of Lisbeth’s character when people actually see the film for themselves. I guess we’ll have to wait and see on that front until more plot-driven trailers are released.
We shall see…

Right, although I’m still excited to see David Fincher’s remake, after actually watching the trilogy (and I will read the books one day too) this poster seems ridiculous. It goes against everything Lisbeth Salander stands for, naked and being subjected to the male gaze, while a man’s arm is around her, protecting her (or holding her back).

And I’m even more confused because I read somewhere that David Fincher had had this poster in his mind for awhile so he must have thought it’s connotations through properly and I can’t write it off as just Hollywood wanting to attract male attention. So is this the direction that Fincher wants to take the film?

Or maybe it’s a double bluff, completely turn around pre-existing ideas of Lisbeth’s character when people actually see the film for themselves. I guess we’ll have to wait and see on that front until more plot-driven trailers are released.

We shall see…

Sucker Punch (directed by Zack Snyder)
Finally! I’m gonna actually post some of my thoughts regarding this movie. Not so much a review because I’m still terrible at that to be honest.
First of all, I loved this film. No, it wasn’t the most thought-provoking or challenging film nor did it have a particularly deep plot but the way I see it, not all films need them. Films can just be fun to watch, right? Sometimes movies that overdo it with the special effects can be extremely dull (I’m gonna reference that half an hour long(?) final battle in Transformers 2 because I was literally looking at anything besides the screen as it dragged on) but Sucker Punch switched it up with each fantasy, going from Japan, to a steampunk World War I, etc.
Now, for the feminism debate that’s been happening surrounding this movie, or rather, happened, I’m a little late with this. I’m really torn on this. On one hand you can argue that the girls are shown as extremely powerful and tough to acquire all the items they need in the fantasies, but in reality it’s just Babydoll dancing provocatively to distract the men who have the things they need in the real world, which isn’t exactly a great message. However, surely what is seen in the movie most is most influential to spectators. I mean, at the end of the day, it may be a fantasy that the girls are taking down the bad guys with their fists but the fact that they are shown doing so is more important than the fact that it isn’t real. Also, with the fantasies taking up the majority of the screen time, and being the focus of the movie’s promotion, the girls’ fantasy selves are gonna be what the audience take home with them. So yes, I’m still undecided about the female empowerment that is or isn’t in the film, but I’d love to hear from anyone who has any thoughts about it, just hit the ask button or reply directly to this.
Now finally, there was one thing I was confused about with this movie. I’d listened extensively to the OST before seeing the film because it featured lots of my favourite artists and I couldn’t resist waiting to listen to it. But it also allowed me to listen to ‘Love Is The Drug’ a lot, sung by Oscar Isaac & Carla Gugino (Blue Jones and Madam Gorski in the film), I loved it on the CD (as well as every other song on it, seriously) and I assumed there would be a big dance number to it or something but there wasn’t. It was used in the credits of the song and obscured clips of a dance sequence were played besides the titles. So does that mean that they filmed an entire scene featuring the song but they cut it out of the film or… what? Because I’m sure I remember hearing Vanessa Hudgens mention something about a dance sequence in an interview I watched somewhere. But anyway, it just bugged me slightly because I am a fan of dance scenes, no doubt though that it wouldn’t’ve exactly helped sell the whole female empowerment issue. Ah well, maybe it’ll be included in full on the DVD release.
All in all, I really enjoyed the film, it definitely favoured style over substance but what’s wrong with that every now and again?
(I might do a post on Sucker Punch’s postmodernism as well, but it won’t be for awhile)

Sucker Punch (directed by Zack Snyder)

Finally! I’m gonna actually post some of my thoughts regarding this movie. Not so much a review because I’m still terrible at that to be honest.

First of all, I loved this film. No, it wasn’t the most thought-provoking or challenging film nor did it have a particularly deep plot but the way I see it, not all films need them. Films can just be fun to watch, right? Sometimes movies that overdo it with the special effects can be extremely dull (I’m gonna reference that half an hour long(?) final battle in Transformers 2 because I was literally looking at anything besides the screen as it dragged on) but Sucker Punch switched it up with each fantasy, going from Japan, to a steampunk World War I, etc.

Now, for the feminism debate that’s been happening surrounding this movie, or rather, happened, I’m a little late with this. I’m really torn on this. On one hand you can argue that the girls are shown as extremely powerful and tough to acquire all the items they need in the fantasies, but in reality it’s just Babydoll dancing provocatively to distract the men who have the things they need in the real world, which isn’t exactly a great message. However, surely what is seen in the movie most is most influential to spectators. I mean, at the end of the day, it may be a fantasy that the girls are taking down the bad guys with their fists but the fact that they are shown doing so is more important than the fact that it isn’t real. Also, with the fantasies taking up the majority of the screen time, and being the focus of the movie’s promotion, the girls’ fantasy selves are gonna be what the audience take home with them. So yes, I’m still undecided about the female empowerment that is or isn’t in the film, but I’d love to hear from anyone who has any thoughts about it, just hit the ask button or reply directly to this.

Now finally, there was one thing I was confused about with this movie. I’d listened extensively to the OST before seeing the film because it featured lots of my favourite artists and I couldn’t resist waiting to listen to it. But it also allowed me to listen to ‘Love Is The Drug’ a lot, sung by Oscar Isaac & Carla Gugino (Blue Jones and Madam Gorski in the film), I loved it on the CD (as well as every other song on it, seriously) and I assumed there would be a big dance number to it or something but there wasn’t. It was used in the credits of the song and obscured clips of a dance sequence were played besides the titles. So does that mean that they filmed an entire scene featuring the song but they cut it out of the film or… what? Because I’m sure I remember hearing Vanessa Hudgens mention something about a dance sequence in an interview I watched somewhere. But anyway, it just bugged me slightly because I am a fan of dance scenes, no doubt though that it wouldn’t’ve exactly helped sell the whole female empowerment issue. Ah well, maybe it’ll be included in full on the DVD release.

All in all, I really enjoyed the film, it definitely favoured style over substance but what’s wrong with that every now and again?

(I might do a post on Sucker Punch’s postmodernism as well, but it won’t be for awhile)